Coffee Vs Tea – What’s The Difference

by PickMyBrewer Team
coffee vs tea

So you are wanting to know the difference between coffee and tea? Or maybe you are both a coffee and tea drinker and wondered what is better for you? Well once you read my guide below you will be amazed at what you read.

Let me start off by concentrating on tea and its benefits:

Coffee Vs Tea Information

coffee vs tea

So you are here as aforementioned because you wanna read more on coffee vs tea. Enjoy my information.

Research has shown that all teas contain tannins, which are naturally occurring flavonoids with strong antioxidant properties. Antioxidants play a role in reducing the risk of cancer, heart disease and stroke.

Tea has proven cancer-fighting abilities and is known to boost the immune system, helping to fight viruses and infection-causing bacteria. Studies have also shown that fluoride-rich teas help prevent tooth decay.

There are many different types of teas available as is there is coffee, which you will find out below in my coffee vs tea guide, but if you are looking to drink to your health, you will want to choose your teas properly. Hands down, White tea is the best choice for the health-conscious.

Because White tea is made of leaves and buds that are “less processed” than for other types of tea, the health benefits of white tea are greater than any other type. Rich in antioxidants, white tea has proven greater cancer-fighting ability than even green tea. White teas are known to boost the immunes system, helping to fight viruses and infection-causing bacteria. Studies have also shown that fluoride-rich white teas help prevent tooth decay.

Green tea is also a wise choice for health purposes and may be less of an acquired taste.

Because Green tea maintains much of its antioxidant properties, the resulting health benefits are great. Green tea has proven cancer-fighting abilities and is known to boost the immune system, helping to fight viruses and infection-causing bacteria.

Studies have shown that drinking 2-3 cups of tea daily yields greater health benefits than drinking just one cup. Of course, tea has the added benefit of relieving stress, if consumed properly.

Drinking Tea for Weight loss

Drinking Tea for Weight loss
The catechin polyphenols found in tea work to increase fat oxidation and thermogenesis, a process by which heat is created by burning fats. Regularly drinking tea will increase the body’s metabolism and burn fat safely and naturally.

Health Benefits of Drinking Tea

Research has shown that all teas contain tannins, which are naturally occurring flavonoids with strong antioxidant properties. Antioxidants play a role in reducing the risk of cancer, heart disease and stroke.

Tea has proven cancer-fighting abilities and is known to boost the immune system, helping to fight viruses and infection-causing bacteria. Studies have also shown that fluoride-rich teas help prevent tooth decay.

Studies have shown that drinking 2-3 cups of tea daily yields greater health benefits than drinking just one cup. Of course, tea has the added benefit of relieving stress, if consumed properly.

Best Teas To Drink: Coffee Vs Tea

Black Tea
The most popular tea in the United States is Black tea and is usually served as iced tea. Its popularity soared following the invention of the teabag in 1904. Although more production goes into the creation of Black teas, studies show that it maintains some of its antioxidant properties and maybe just as healthy as its White and Green counterparts.

Raspberry Tea
Raspberry tea is used for ailments such as intestinal inflammation and diarrhoea. The tannins in Raspberry tea reduce swelling by constricting capillaries, preventing fluid discharge into the intestines.

Peppermint Tea
Peppermint, a herb that contains no caffeine, is consumed in tea form after meals to relieve gas pain and calm the digestive system.

Sassafras Tea
Sassafras tea is often hailed for its medicinal properties, utilized as a blood purifier, and as a treatment for rheumatism, skin disease, syphilis, typhus, dropsy and other diseases.

White Peony Tea (Bai Mu Dan)
White Peony is grown primarily in the Fujian Province of China in two different areas, the Jiang Yang and Zheng He counties. White Peony grown in Jiang Yang is considered to have a better appearance, but White Peony from Zheng He, where it is mainly produced, is said to be more flavorful. White Peony has a bold taste with hints of oak, nut and vanilla with an apricot colour brew. To enjoy White Peony, it is best to brew it Gongfu style, using more tea with a shorter steep time.

Mint Tea
Peppermint, a herb that contains no caffeine, is consumed in tea form after meals to relieve gas pain and calm the digestive system.

Dandelion Tea
Dandelion tea has been used to treat a number of health conditions including arthritis, gout, liver ailments, heartburn, cancer, diabetes and rheumatism.

Chinese Tea
No one knows exactly when the first tea was brewed, but experts date it back to nearly 4,000 years ago in China. Initially used for medicinal and ceremonial purposes, tea became a popular beverage during the Han Dynasty (200BC-200AD) and by the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644) tea had become a major trading commodity in China.

Herbal Tea
Herbal tea is an infusion of boiling water with dried fruit, flower or herb. There are many health benefits associated with the various herbal teas available today.

Chamomile Tea
With its apple flavour and aroma, Chamomile is a soothing tea that has been proven to help the body relieve a number of ailments from stress to menstrual cramps. A golden tone and delicate flavour Chamomile tea is used to reduce stress, promote relaxation and restful sleep, reduce inflammation and more!

Chrysanthemum Tea
Chrysanthemum is often used to decrease body heat and is recommended for those with fever and sore throat.

Yerba Mate Tea
Yerba Mate tea sometimes called Hierba Mate tea or, simply Mate tea, is made from a species of Holly that is native to subtropical South America. Low in caffeine, Yerba Mate tea is said to offer energy, appetite control and mental clarity, as well as allergy and asthma relief.

Chai Tea
Chai is simply an Asian word for “tea.” However, Masala Chai, an Indian variety of tea, is called Chai in the United States. Masala Chai is an ancient beverage savoured for its rich and complex flavour.

Ginseng Tea
For centuries, Koreans have recognized the medicinal powers of Ginseng. It has been used to treat several common illnesses, including heart disease.

Ginger Tea
Made from Ginger, a natural spice, Ginger has been for centuries as having great medicinal value. It is most effective in relieving upset stomachs; however, it has also been used to reduce inflammation and tone the muscles of the digestive tract.

Rooibos tea, also known as Red tea, comes from the leaves of the “Aspalathus linearis” plant, indigenous to Africa. Like Green tea, Rooibos tea is high in vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants, making it a healthy beverage.

African women have long enjoyed Rooibos tea during pregnancy because it is high in iron, contains no caffeine. It also relieves heartburn and nausea. In addition, it has been known to relieve colic in babies. Recent studies have shown that Rooibos tea may help prevent cirrhosis of the liver.

Hibiscus tea
Hibiscus tea was the tea of choice among the Pharaohs of the ancient Nile Valley but has a long history throughout many cultures including China, Mexico and the Caribbean. Hibiscus tea is said to help lower blood pressure and cool the body. It contains no caffeine.

Kombucha Tea
Kombucha tea is a delicious and healthy beverage, said to ease many common health problems. Kombucha tea works with the body to boost its natural ability to fight disease as well as balance metabolism and maintain healthy organs.

Jasmine Tea
Jasmine tea is one of the most delicious Green teas available today, and it may be the healthiest. Recent studies have shown that Jasmine tea may be more beneficial than other Green teas. Jasmine tea is said to lower cholesterol and promote healthy living.

Oolong Tea
A cup of Oolong tea has less caffeine than a cup of Green or Black tea, but it is just as rich in antioxidants that help prevent cancer and maintain a healthy heart.

Red Tea
Red Tea, also known as Rooibos, comes from the leaves of the “Aspalathus linearis” plant, indigenous to Africa. Like Green tea, Red tea is high in vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants, making it a healthy beverage.

African women have long enjoyed Red tea during pregnancy because it is high in iron, contains no caffeine. It also relieves heartburn and nausea. In addition, it has been known to relieve colic in babies. Recent studies have shown that red tea may help prevent cirrhosis of the liver.

Green Tea
Green tea has been consumed for centuries throughout Asia and the Middle East. In that time it has been used as a stimulant, a diuretic and as an astringent.

Because Green tea maintains much of its antioxidant properties, the resulting health benefits are great. Green tea has proven cancer-fighting abilities and is known to boost the immune system, helping to fight viruses and infection-causing bacteria. Studies have also shown that fluoride-rich Green teas help prevent tooth decay.

White Tea
White tea is technically the oldest form of tea because it is really the first tea ever consumed and, the least processed. Other processing techniques later led to the production of other teas.

Because White tea is made of leaves and buds that are “less processed” than for other types of tea, the health benefits of white tea are greater than any other type. Rich in antioxidants, white tea has proven greater cancer-fighting ability than even green tea. White teas are known to boost the immunes system, helping to fight viruses and infection-causing bacteria. Studies have also shown that fluoride-rich white teas help prevent tooth decay.

Black Tea
The most popular tea in the United States is Black tea and is usually served as iced tea. Its popularity soared following the invention of the teabag in 1904. Although more production goes into the creation of Black teas, studies show that it maintains some of its antioxidant properties and maybe just as healthy as its White and Green counterparts.

Ahhh!!! waking up to that rich wafting aroma of the first coffee brew in the morning as the rich aroma fills the house.  Walking into the coffee shop at midday just after our lunch energy crash and hearing the fresh coffee beans being ground in anticipation of your vente cafe mocha.  For coffee drinkers, it is not just a daily liquid intake, it is a ritualistic, rich and tasteful experience that just so happens to bring us the added Coffee Health Benefits of increased energy, more focus and a nice hefty dose of antioxidants. There are even certain types of coffee that can induce Thermogenics a fat-burning process throughout our day. I love it…

Coffee vs Tea Benefits

There are now proven medical studies that can make those delicious cups of coffee you drink even more enjoyable.  Check out my blog to read about the proven health benefits of daily coffee consumption.  I also plan on posting the best brands of healthy coffee, the latest in healthy coffee news and even healthy coffee recipes. Check out just a few of the health benefits coffee has to offer:

Some Possible Health Benefits of Drinking Coffee According to Recent Research:
Increased Focus
Improved Memory
Increased Energy
Antioxidants – Fight Free Radicals
Fat Burning – Thermogenesis

A growing body of research also shows that coffee drinkers, compared to nondrinkers, are:

less likely to have type 2 diabetes, Parkinson’s disease, and dementia
have fewer cases of certain cancers, heart rhythm problems, and strokes

Coffee also contains minerals such as magnesium and chromium, which help the body use the hormone insulin, which controls blood sugar (glucose). In type 2 diabetes, the body loses its ability to use insulin and regulate blood sugar effectively. Organic, Infrared Roasted Coffee will give you the most antioxidant & mineral power punch.

For Parkinson’s disease, the data have always been very consistent: higher consumption of coffee is associated with decreased risk of Parkinson’s, due to caffeine.

Coffee has also been linked to lower risk of dementia, including Alzheimer’s disease. A 2009 study from Finland and Sweden showed that, out of 1,400 people followed for about 20 years, those who reported drinking 3-5 cups of coffee daily were 65% less likely to develop dementia and Alzheimer’s disease, compared with nondrinkers or occasional coffee drinkers.

 

What Are The Benefits Of Coffee As Opposed to tea?

Coffee is the largest consumed beverage in the world, sold in almost all countries of the world. It is brewed from the roasted seeds, typically called coffee beans, of the coffee plant, from which it derives its name. It is grown and cultivated in over seventy countries across the world. Green unroasted coffee beans are one of the most traded agricultural commodities in the world with the primary exporters being Latin America, Southeast Asia and Africa. After water, it is regarded as one of the most consumed drink in the world.

History Of Coffee

Premium Coffee Beans

Coffee was first consumed for purely spiritual reasons. Over a millennium ago, traders first brought the seeds across the Red Sea into modern-day Yemen, where the Muslim population of the region began cultivating the plants in their gardens. However, unlike the current beverage made out of the beans, they made wine, known as gishr, from the fermented coffee berries. This was usually consumed during religious ceremonies of the period. It has evolved from this to a drink with many varieties of uses and forms. The drink is now brewed and presented in over fifty different varieties.

The Health Benefits Of Coffee

Start Your Day With Coffee

The primary constituent of coffee, caffeine acts a stimulant and hence finds a variety of applications. However, the benefits of coffee extend beyond managing to keep one awake and reduce stress.
The consumption off coffee, on a regular basis, is found to reduce the risk of the onset of diseases such as Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s and gallstone disease.

Coffee contains the compound methyl pyridinium, a known anti-cancer compound. Though this is not found natively in the coffee seeds or the plant, it is formed during the roasting of the beans. This compound is not found in measurable amounts in any other foodstuff and hence regular consumption of coffee reduces the risk of cancer.

Mmm. Coffee Break!

The stimulant action of coffee is not limited to the brain and extends all the way up to the lower intestine. It is a powerful stimulant of the peristaltic movement and hence is a good antidote to constipation.

Coffee has long been used as one of the most effective analgesics throughout history. It not only acts as a standalone pain killer but also enhances the effects of other pain killers and hence caffeine forms a part of many over the counter painkillers.

The consumption of coffee is also known to reduce the instances of liver cancer, reducing the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma.

Possible Risks
Coffee has long been known to be a risk to pregnant women and young children. The consumption of coffee amongst both mothers and infants leads a drop in the blood iron levels, while it also interferes with the assimilation of supplementary iron.

Don’t Get Addicted Or You’ll End Up Like This Guy

Apart from antioxidants which reduce the risk of cancer, the roasting of coffee also results in certain compounds called rodent carcinogens which when consumed in large quantities can be carcinogenic. Though these are naturally occurring, prolonged consumption in large quantities can prove harmful.

Coffee consumption can also damage the inner lining of the intestines causing gastritis and stomach ulcers. Coffee consumption has also been linked to increased instances of high blood pressure. This invariantly results in an increased risk of coronary heart disease. However decaffeinated coffee to an extent counters the ill effects of prolonged caffeine consumption

Types of Coffee

While there are more than six thousand species of the coffee plant, the two main types are known as Arabica and Robusta.

Arabica (Coffea Arabica)

Arabica is grown in the following regions:

  • Central America (Panama, Mexico, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Nicaragua)
  • South America ( Argentina, Venezuela, Peru, Paraguay, Ecuador, Colombia)
  • India
  • East Africa
  • Papua New Guinea

With a rather delicate acidic flavour, less caffeine content, and a slight caramel aftertaste, Arabica is considered superior to Robusta. It also accounts for around 70-per cent of world production.

Robusta (Coffea Canephora)

Although its plant is cheaper to grow than Arabica, Robusta coffee is excellent and accounts to around 40-per cent of world production. Characterized by a strong flavour, with lots of bodies, Robusta is produced in the following regions:

  • South-East Asia
  • West and Central Africa
  • Parts of South America

Are You A Coffee or Tea Lover?

Coffee drinkers are as in love with coffee as wine drinkers and pipe smokers with their habits, but may be less aware of their infatuation. Who hasn’t refused to give up some coffee-darkened eyesore of a cup, despite social pressures that would crumble Romeo or Juliet? There it stays, on the bottom shelf, messing up the effect of four feet of sparkling porcelain and glassware. This is plainly the stubbornness of love. There are people who refused to give up their cups to the waiter – and they didn’t want a refill either. They just wanted that cup sitting there to bring back memories, and maybe fondle now and then, until the aroma went away.

There are significant differences, however, between a coffee lover and, say, a wine fancier. The wine lover first knows a good deal about wine, or at least can talk a good deal about wine, and second craves variety. One seldom is served the same wine twice when one goes to dinner at a wine fancier’s house, whereas even people who pay attention to coffee tend to settle on one brand and one mode of preparation, and stay with it for years, morning after morning, night after night.

About Coffee vs Tea Drinking Habits

Times are changing, of course. Along with everything else, coffee-drinking habits are being re-examined by the kitchen fundamentalists, the new-wave gourmets, the nutritionists, the dietary faddists. Coffee drinking itself is still something of a novelty in the world, but the statistics indicate the novelty is rapidly turning into a habit.  What appears to hinder such an attitude is:

  • The easy availability of cheap instant coffees
  • The national tendency to make coffee in the image of tea by over-brewing it
  • Holding it too long, and killing what flavour is left with heavy applications of milk

The Gourmet Coffee Tradition

While this development was taking place, the sophisticates and connoisseurs were buying their coffees in shops that specialized in coffee, or perhaps in coffee, tea and spices. Here the selection was more varied, with certain traditional. gourmet coffees leading the list:

  • Arabian Mocha
  • ‘Old Government’ Java
  • Jamaican Blue Mountain
  • Sumatran
  • In France, Guadeloupe and Haitian replaced the Blue Mountain
  • In the United States certain Central American coffees
  • Kona from Hawaii might be added to the list
  • In addition, every shop had its traditional or ‘secret’ blend.

When pre-roasted and pre-ground coffee began to be sold in tins and ‘bags, the gourmet coffee tradition went underground. The little speciality shops which still roasted their own coffees, the traditional grocers who still carried a selection of fresh whole bean coffees, continued to serve a small coffee-drinking elite, while everyone else rushed by to the tea-bags and the instant.

Brew It Yourself And Making Coffee Expertly In Your Own Home

It is indisputable that the majority of the coffee vs tea drinkers in the world today keep the manufacturers of instant coffee in business.  But the fact that you now in this website is some indication that your interest in coffee goes beyond unscrewing the lid from a jar and spooning up a measure of powder or granules.

There is a special enjoyment to be had from doing it yourself coffee making.  The sounds, the aroma, the satisfying sense of achieving your own standards of perfection in the coffee cup:  all can be yours, simply, once you know-how.  This coffee drinking website is a guide to making coffee expertly in your own home.

Coffee Varieties Around The World

While there are many teas to choose from, when it comes to coffee vs tea varieties, there are a lot of coffee varieties to consider. More than one-third of the people in the world today are coffee drinkers. Although this is certainly an impressive figure, its generality conceals a far more impressive array of facts. Coffee’s popularity is not confined to any one country or continent or culture.

It is found in the Middle East, where the coffee habit has changed little in hundreds of years; in Africa, where an expanding modern coffee commerce coexists with ancient customs; in Great Britain and Europe, where the coffeehouse still reigns despite the passing of its cultural glory, and where the German Kaffeeklatsch evolved as a social art; in America, which is often characterized, or caricatured, as a land of coffee swillers; in Latin America, where the prime commodity of coffee is an inseparable part of daily life; and even in tea drinking Asia, where, surprisingly, coffee is in places the traditional popular drink, and elsewhere is growing in popularity.

Summing Up Coffee vs Tea

Let me know your thought on my coffee vs tea guide, and comment below what your favourite is.

 

I hope you enjoyed my coffee vs tea guide.

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